Category Archives: Learning

Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning Resources for Developers (or anyone “technical”)

Artificial Intelligence is the single most important endeavor ever under taken by humanity. If you care to learn the technical side of this venture, I’ve put together a short-and-growing list of resources to look at for introductory learning and exploration purposes.

Please enjoy and suggest additions.


Artificial Intelligence (MIT 6.034)

from the course description:

“introduces students to the basic knowledge representation, problem solving, and learning methods of artificial intelligence. Upon completion of 6.034, students should be able to develop intelligent systems by assembling solutions to concrete computational problems”

Deep Learning for Self-Driving Cars

MIT 6.S094

from the intro:

“an introduction to the practice of deep learning through the applied theme of building a self-driving car. It is open to beginners and is designed for those who are new to machine learning, but it can also benefit advanced researchers in the field looking for a practical overview of deep learning methods and their application.”

Develop Your First Neural Network in Python With Keras Step-By-Step

Introduction to Neural Networks on the high-level ML platform Keras.

Fast.Ai

trying to make AI less “exclusive”. Practical courses and tutorials. Cool branding.

Gitxiv

from the about page:

“GitXiv is a space to share collaborative open computer science projects. Countless Github and arXiv links are floating around the web. Its hard to keep track of these gems. GitXiv attempts to solve this problem by offering a collaboratively curated feed of projects. Each project is conveniently presented as arXiv + Github + Links + Discussion.”

Machine Learning with Andrew Ng on Coursera

This is the definitive college-level course on Machine Learning. It has nearly 12,000 reviews. I’m working through it presently. Includes a great intro/refresher to linear algebra (that I needed).

Thanks to Stanford for providing the material.

Machine Learning is Fun!

The world’s easiest introduction to Machine Learning

There’s also a video course on Lynda.

Recurrent Neural Network Tutorial for Artists

from the post:

“This post is not meant to be a comprehensive overview of recurrent neural networks. It is intended for readers without any machine learning background. The goal is to show artists and designers how to use a pre-trained neural network to produce interactive digital works using simple Javascript and p5.js library.”

Simple Reinforcement Learning with Tensorflow

Introduction to practical application of Q-learning and neural networks using TensorFlow.

TensorFlow for Poets

How to build an image classifier in TensorFlow for poets.

Why I Produced a Podcast from Scratch

My outline and notes from episode 1 with Michael Alexis

I love talking to people. When a good friend suggested doing a podcast to market my skills, he sold me on the following points:

  • You will learn a lot.
  • You will build deeper relationships with your guests.
  • You will improve at the art of conversation.

These aspirations were so motivating to me that I immediately started scheduling episodes and planning a show around these ideas.

This is how I planned and executed a 14-episode podcast featuring my friends and mentors.

Learning

Throughout Season 1 of Hacker Practice I interview creative people engaged in entrepreneurial ventures. I interview engineers and scientists and growth hackers. I interviewed my coaches and mentors, friends and inspiration.

These interviews have taught me:

  1. Novel marketing tactics for this podcast
  2. What Big Data is
  3. Breathing exercises for strength
  4. About this Haruki Murakami fellow
  5. How to build a nuclear power plant in my backyard
  6. How to find a technical cofounder
  7. A new method for learning complex topics from scratch
  8. The basic elements of photography
  9. To ask for feedback after every “no” in sales
  10. How steel quality is measured
  11. A new strategy for generating leads online
  12. A strategy for being more productive and getting fit at the same time
  13. How successful residential real estate investors consider investments
  14. Which hormones make you hungry
  15. and much more…

Further, the process of organizing, recording, and editing a podcast has taught me a variety of technical skills. I now have an understanding of basic audio recording and editing technologies. To be specific, Season One of Hacker Practice was recorded using Ecamm Call Recorder for Skype and edited on the open source audio editing suite, Audacity.

The show will be published and syndicated through Libsyn. I use the $50 / month tier because the show averages an hour and is published one season per quarter. You’ll find syndicated feeds on iTunes and YouTube as of March 15th.

The Craft of Conversation

Listening to myself interview someone has been like watching game film: Occasionally embarrassing, always enlightening.

How easily do you produce a concise question or decisive analysis?

If you’ve never recorded and reviewed yourself having a conversation, you probably have no idea.

Interviewing my friends and role models has given me an outside view of our dynamic. The perspective gives you a quantum of self-awareness otherwise impossible to achieve.

How many people really see themselves as they are? An easier question to answer is: how many people see themselves at all? The answer is probably close to 0%. Which basically makes self-examination via audio/video a power move.

I’m not saying I’m suddenly a meditative zen master. I’m saying that I’ve now listened to myself have 14 different long-form conversations with people I like and admire. In the process, I’ve begun to eliminate verbal ticks and conversational faux pas (“begun” being key here).

Relationship Building

The people I interview are my friends. I’ve done business with many of them. I respect each one of them for their accomplishments and character.

They have so much to teach me. Normal social calls don’t allow for the kind of invasive questioning possible in an interview format. Interviews can be like conversation on steroids. The act of being recorded engages you. It forces you to listen actively and question incisively.

It’s an intimate act. Both parties cannot emerge without having developed the relationship. This is why I interview people I admire and want to have long-term relationships with.

Because: friendships matter.

How I’m producing, editing and publishing my own podcast.

Here are the steps to producing your own podcast.

  1. Get convinced
    1. It takes some confidence to get started. Commit to doing at least 7 episodes or a season. I started off planning to record and release six episodes. Those six episodes quickly turned into a 14-episode season.
  2. Start scheduling
    1. Call the people close to you first. Everybody I interview in season one is a friend that I admire for some reason.
    2. Choose to interview people you’re comfortable talking to. My nervous ticks smooth out toward the end of season one because I get more comfortable talking to people.
  3. Record a test call
    1. Do a call with a friend that you don’t intend to publish. This is just to get the hang of the mechanics.
  4. Write outlines for interviews.
    1. This is optional. At first I wrote thorough outlines to plan our conversations. I quickly realized that they could be a negative constraint. Great conversations are often non-linear. Most people don’t learn in a strictly linear fashion. Outlines, however, are notoriously linear. If you stick too closely to an outline you will miss big opportunities.
  5. Start interviewing
    1. Use a checklist:
      1. Is your outline printed? Do you have pens and paper and water and coffee?
      2. Call the person. Is the connection solid?
      3. Do you have enough storage?
      4. Are both parties comfortable? What is everyone bringing to the conversation in terms of mental space? Is their expectation in alignment with yours regarding topics of conversation and duration.
      5. Phones and notifications turned off?
      6. Deep breath.
      7. Hit record.
      8. Few moments of silence.
      9. “Hello Michael, thank you for being on the show, how are you?:”
      10. When it’s done, take a few minutes to debrief. Thank the person again. And let them know.
  6. Packaging the recording
    1. Edit the podcast
      1. I add an intro and an outro and that’s it
    2. Take notes
    3. Find links.
    4. Write summaries
    5. Find pictures
    6. Send all materials to the guest for review
    7. Change anything they want changed
    8. Schedule the post
  7. Publishing the recording
    1. Use libsyn to syndicate to iTunes and Youtube
    2. Apple takes a couple days to review and publish your podcast.
  8. Post-publication
    1. Promote on social media
    2. Send to your email list
    3. Thank the guest again
    4. Invite them back on the show (about to start working on Season Two!)

And that’s it!

Conclusion

Starting a podcast like Hacker Practice hasn’t blown up my business. It hasn’t gotten thousands of downloads (hundreds though, not bad). It hasn’t turned me into Tim Ferriss or Oprah.

It has taught me a lot about conversation. It’s taught me about my friends and mentors and the work they do and what they find important. It’s deepened my relationships and strengthened my soft skills.

I’m glad I did it and I hope that this might help some of you do the same.

Good luck!

Optimizing the Human Experience with Chris Schelzi

Listen to this episode on iTunes today!

A lot of this conversation has to do with getting ripped. Chris Schelzi knows a bit about fitness.

I met Chris in early 2015. He was working at BlackRock, Inc. at the time. The startup I was working on at the time poached him. I guess he liked the team…

Chris helped that startup raise more than a quarter of a million dollars in a crowdfunding campaign.

Now, he’s working at AppSumo, bringing you great deals on cool tools for your company.

In our conversation, Chris and I dive deep into:

  • Coffee
  • Hedonism
  • Diet and Exercise
  • Ideas for the next great health tech startup
  • How AppSumo is empowering entrepreneurs

Please enjoy this episode of Hacker Practice with my good friend Chris Schelzi.

Notes

[02:00] French Press vs Chemex

  • French Press = Full immersion, full body
  • Chemex filters do a lot of heavy lifting

[06:00] Justus’s favorite cup of coffee

[07:20] BOOKS

and Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power by John Meacham

[16:00] Coffee as a vice. How to best enjoy vices in general.

[17:30] Why you shouldn’t be afraid to return things to the store

[18:30] Zen Roaster. Roasting your own coffee. Moving meditation. Coffee rituals. Chris built himself a side-table.

  • Designing and building things by hand is zen af.

[23:30] We talk about axes and camping for a bit

[26:30] Our mutual interest in health and physiology

  • Diet – How to get shredded like Chris?
    • Low carb, high fat.
  • Exercise recommendations?

Frozen Fatty Coffee Drink

Chameleon Cold Brew

[39:00] How to teach anti-science people a better way.

“Show them a cleaner glass of water”.

Bulletproof Coffee gets mentioned about a hundred times.

[43:00] Intermittent fasting. Strength training + Tabata Sprints

Diet scheduling. Fasting from protein can improve protein utilization. Lift heavy things and sprint. Keep it simple.

“Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants” – Michael Pollan’s Food Rules

[46:00] Isometrics workouts to build strength without putting stress on joints. On grass or in the pool. “Jack your heart rate up”.

[49:00] Chris’s $10,000 offer for a health technology product for monitoring various biological markers

  • The state of health monitoring is abysmal for the average or even extraordinary consumer
  • Idea – Implant that continually measures important biomarkers. Measure in real time.
  • Dutch testing for cortisol and other hormones
  • This idea could change the way we interact with dieting and health in general
  • What would a version one of this tech look like? Measuring the following:
    • Sex Hormones
    • Stress Hormones
    • Cholesterol
    • Fat Soluble Vitamins (A, E, D, K)
    • Glucose and Ketones

[1:02:30] What is Chris working on now?

  • AppSumo – Groupon for Geeks
  • DesignBold – Design made easy
  • SerpStat – All in one SEO tooling
  • The cult of the “Sumo-ling”

[1:05:30] What kind of company works with AppSumo

  • GREAT tools for small businesses
  • Validated by some users
  • Startups that have Product Market Fit and are looking to scale to the next level

[1:10:00] Chris’s role at AppSumo

  • Operations and Marketing
  • Focusing on retention in 2017

[1:13:00] Final requests

Conclusion

This conversation could have easily been three times as long. I’ll certainly have Chris on the show again.

If you enjoyed today’s episode please subscribe to the show and leave a review on iTunes.

Johnny Boursiquot on building a software agency from scratch, learning Go for Rubyists, and server-less software architectures.

Listen to this episode of Hacker Practice on iTunes today.

Sometimes you start a conversation with one intention, and digress into something completely different.

This happened to me recently, in a conversation with an old friend and mentor, Johnny Boursiquot.

Johnny and I were supposed to do a deep dive into Go Lang and Ruby in this hour long conversation. Instead we spent half an hour talking about Johnny’s experience building a technology agency from scratch.

Then we got around to talking tech XD.

Johnny is well-known as one of the pillars of BostonRB. He also helped to organize the Boston GoLang meetup before moving to Maryland where he founded Baltimore’s GoLang Meetup.

He was listed on New Relic’s list of 18 Go Experts to Follow Online.

In the episode we talk about:

  • Johnny’s lessons learned from founding and building a tech agency, lots of juicy business advice for consulting companies and agencies in the first half of this talk
  • The relative pros and cons of using ruby vs go in different domains
  • How to get started using a new language

  • A quick primer in serverless application architectures

  • How intermediate devs can 10x their workflow

And a lot more.

Enjoy.

Notes

[00:00] What brings Johnny to Maryland after living more than a decade in Boston

  • What brought him to Boston in the first place

[02:30] Major lessons learned from time in Boston running a technology company

  • Running a company means that you’re responsible for other people’s income
  • Many unexpected challenges: biz dev, legal, etc

[05:15] How did Johnny get started in technology business.

  • Started with entrepreneurship in high school

[08:00] Learning how to do business

  • Dealing with clients
  • Managing expectation
  • Touching on the difference between hacking and building a product

[11:00] #1 Lesson? The difference between a service business and product business

  • Agencies do not scale the same way a product scales
  • Most agencies do not end up producing a lot of reusable technology or internal products
  • It’s hard to do internal product development because your staff is busy with revenue generating service activities
  • It’s risky to invest in product development

[20:00] What would Johnny do differently if he could start over?

  • Start a product company: raise money.

[23:00] What about the reverse situation? Making a profitable, successful agency.

  • Protect your margins
  • Be flexible with workflow; Agile doesn’t always work smoothly in an agency environment
  • “They want warez”
  • Your job is to tease out the specifics of what the client actually wants
  • “You’re not in control of your own product roadmap”

[27:30] How to mitigate risk of scope creep

  • Establish a relationship; a partnership to guarantee future work
  • Get a Master Services Agreement

[32:00] Segue to technical discussion. What is Ruby good for vs Golang?

  • Ruby for developing something fast. “Getting a web app out there as fast as possible”
  • GoLang is better for heavy lifting, whenever performance is a consideration

[37:45] What are Johnny’s tips for learning Go (or any language)

  • “Leave baggage at the door…appreciate the differences of Go”
  • There is a “Go Way” of doing things

[41:15] What kind of project should I try using GO in

  • Anything with heavy duty network requirements
  • Microservices (“Something you can throw away”)
  • “Gnarly, performance-critical jobs”
  • Concurrency in Go is super-awesome

[45:00] AWS Lambda and Serverless 101

  • Not actually “serverless”. That’s a marketing term. There is always a server somewhere.
  • Monolithic App > Microservices > Lambda functions
  • Everything is a discrete functional unit
  • Very cost-effective because the server only runs when you call the function

[51:30] What can an intermediate Rails developer to 10-20x their workflow

  • Look past the magic of the language (Ruby) or framework (Rails)
  • Learn the underlying properties of the WYSIWYG
  • Understand how SQL, HTTP, Databases, and CURL — fundamentals of the web — work
  • Learning the underlying complexity enables you to use the higher-level abstractions more rapidly

[59:00] Johnny’s relationship with the command line

  • Used to work in Windows, and mostly everything was a GUI
  • Put together command-line tools to build Flash experiences
  • Started using Ubuntu – understood that there are discrete tools to use and stitch together from the command line
  • Now uses a Mac. Everything can be done from the terminal

[1:05:45] Running swift on the server

[1:07:00] Johnny’s new life hack

  • Modified Pomodoro with a physical twist

[1:10:00] Johnny’s child-rearing hacks

    • Every child is different
    • Reward effort over innate qualities
    • Lots of people squander innate talent. Working hard never fails.

[1:14:00] Johnny’s new job at an education non-profit

  • Serving under-served school districts
  • Exposing diverse groups to the world of technology
  • Bring education equity to the communities that need it most
  • Mostly doing ops work these days
  • The biggest challenge is always dealing with people
  • Johnny loves pairing with more junior members

[1:20:00] Final requests to the audience and where to find Johnny

What now?

Go become a better programmer. And subscribe to the show on iTunes.

Caricature Artist Julia Kelly on Art, Business, and Bookkeeping (e011)

Listen to this episode of Hacker Practice on iTunes.

Julia Kelly and Justus in the Cayman Islands

Do you know somebody who loves to argue?

I’m one of those people. So is Julia Kelly.

We’re great together.

Julia is the most renowned caricature artist west of the Mississippi. She built her business from scratch and is currently starting business #2.

I guess I caught her at a good time.

When I asked her to do an interview with me. She made an interesting request: “Let’s wing it!”

She’s been on some pretty awesome podcasts including: Entrepreneur on Fire, Double your Freelancing, and Afford Anything. She says: the less scripted the show, the more fun the interview.

My old college buddies would agree: Justus loves “doing it live”. So I agreed to do the episode with ZERO PREPARATION.

Typically I prepare for interviews with rigorous research and outline a list of topics to talk about. In this case I did no such thing. Shoot, I didn’t even take notes until after we recorded the conversation.

The result was a fascinating conversations that covers art, business and everything in between. Enjoy 😀

[00:00] This is an unconventional episode. Julia explains why.

[01:55] How Julia introduces herself as

  • A Bookkeeper
  • A Caricature Artist

[4:30] How to be a success without trying very hard

  • Morning rituals and meditation are for the birds
  • How to be successful without them: Show up, do good work, and keep your word.

Sine qua non noun

  1. an essential condition; a thing that is absolutely necessary.

[07:00] Some ways Julia and Justus are different

[10:00] Why Julia is moving into the bookkeeping business

  • Recurring revenue, predictability, stability
  • Partnership

[13:30] Julia shoots down the concept of “following your passion”

  • It’s a fleeting feeling

[16:00] How Julia developed the craft of caricature art

  • Time on task is the most important aspect of developing artistic ability
  • Got a job at LEGO Land
  • The job had a 6-hour training program where everything was done in a marker
  • No erasing
  • Don’t be a perfectionist (“If it’s 80% good, ship it!”)

[24:00] Julia’s and Justus’ artistic influences

Julia Kelly’s Bust of JRR Tolkien

[32:30] The story of the Captain’s hat and lessons Justus learned from an experiment in fame

  • Fame is cheap
  • Anonymity is priceless

[37:30] Julia’s struggles with identifying her strengths

[40:30] Julia’s friend who knows Tom Cruise

  • Confidence is extremely valuable.
  • Fake it ‘til you make it

[42:30] Julia’s story getting started freelancing

  • Market focus made all the difference

[45:30] Selling to trade show marketers

  • Tracking ROI is important
  • “Connect what you do to the outcomes they want.”
  • Attract traffic
  • Create follow-up opportunities
  • Create the right marketing language and identify with their needs
  • Get one customer and drill them for what sold them
  • Get feedback to improve (Peter Dunbar echoed this in episode 8)

[53:30] What lessons from caricature art transfer to bookkeeping

  • Pricing for bookkeeping is more custom, so don’t advertise fixed prices
  • Longer sales cycle for bookkeeping

[56:30] Successes and failures in bookkeeping

  • 3 client since August
  • Cold email works!

[57:30] How to cold email effectively using LinkedIn

  • Julia sends 70 canned emails a day
  • The 556th email hit!

[1:00:00] Justus tells a story about canned cold emails that worked on him

  • Follow up 4 times!
  • Follow up again!

Yet Another Mail Merge Google Sheets Extension

[1:04:00] Julia’ Bookkeeping goals and differentiating factors

  • 7 figure business
  • Totally remote
  • Flat monthly fees

[1:05:45] Julia’s ideal client is hands-off, casual, comfortable with remote bookkeeping, and wears plaid

  • Rapidly growing startups are a good fit in many cases

[1:08:30] Julia wants everyone to go read Slatestarcodex and talk to her about it.

Check Julia out at

Also, Julia thinks GMO’s are safe. That is all.

What else?

That’s all. Actually, wait, no. Go to iTunes and subscribe to the show. And leave us a review 😀

Peter Dunbar: B2B Sales and the Art of Conversation

Listen to this episode of Hacker Practice on iTunes!

Sales is really hard.

Technical people often discount the value of the work done in sales and marketing. They discount the value until they have to sell themselves or their product. Then they learn that sales is hard.

If you’re looking to improve your sales abilities, this is the episode for you.

Peter Dunbar is one the most engaging conversationalists I know. He’s willing to talk at length with just about anybody. He is fearless and determined and brings big contracts into any firm that he works with.

He’s also and avid hacker, but that will have to wait until part two.

Enjoy this episode of Hacker Practice with master salesman, Peter Dunbar.

Links:

known.creative

Core dna

Reach out to Peter:

Email: peter@knowncreative.co

Phone number after the jump*

Notes

[3.30] Peter describes how he has been able to get work through the art of conversation (without presenting a resume)

  • Peter uses conversation as a problem solving tool to “hack” an outcome or a goal

[4.45] What hacking means to Peter

  • Hacking is a “lifestyle”

[9.30] Peter describes how an unforgettable conversation with his thesis advisor changed the course of his career

[11.15] Peter describes the relationship between software and hardware when developing the Pavlok wearable

[15.45] Why resourcing is the biggest challenge in building a new hardware product

[17.30] Why running a crowdfunding campaign to launch a new product without any traction is a big mistake

[18.45] How the art of conversation has allowed Peter to transition from engineering to sales

[21.30] Why it’s important to adopt a sales mindset of helping the customer succeed along with you.

  • How a conversation with a support engineer was the catalyst for Peter being able to close a sales deal for one of the world’s largest e-commerce consumer brands
  • Peter was able to engage the CXO level by pointing out that their marketing strategy was being stonewalled by poor website architecture, preventing them from being able to develop a best practice ecommerce platform.

[27.50] How Peter called into a radio station to pitch to the GM of the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) while he was being interviewed on air.

  • This opportunity bias helps Peter take advantage of such situations

[31.30] Why the feedback loop is so important in improving your sales process, especially in the face of rejection

[35.00] Peter discusses known.creative, a digital agency in Boston, Massachusetts where he now heads up sales.

  • How partnering with Core dna – an all-in-one SAAS Digital Platform has allowed known.creative to scale and offer global enterprise offerings to companies, at drastically reduced development and implementation costs

[37.50] Peter shares his thoughts on the marketing agency model

  • Why it is most important to be able to show how your solution will drive a positive ROI for your client. E.g. There is no point “selling” a $50k website if it won’t turn a positive ROI for your client
  • The importance of being frank about business relationships and focusing on making money.
  • Building and sustaining a long term relationship is critical in enabling both parties to make more money

[41.40] Why many ecommerce companies are naive about threats to their online platforms and IP

[46.30] Peter explains why security for the SMB/SME market is going to be a huge growth market

[48.40] How the legalisation of marijuana in Massachusetts is going to drive a new wave of tech/digital opportunities in the commercial landscape (outside of recreation)

[51.00] Why updating your website and making the effort to have a great digital presence, is so important, in building trust and engaging your customer base

[52.00] Why known.creative uses its own brand and website as a testing ground for solutions before engaging customers

[54.50] Reach out to Peter:

Email: peter@knowncreative.co

Cell: +1 (207) 649-5037 – only if you want to have a conversation!

What now?

Give Pete a call. Thank him for his time.

Then subscribe to this podcast on iTunes. And leave us a raving review 😀

Life at the Bleeding Edge of Technology (AI) and Education (MIT + Nuvu) with David Wang

Listen to Episode 7 of Hacker Practice on iTunes.

I met David Wang at a vegetarian restaurant in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He was introduced to me by our mutual friend Naf Visser (episode 008). David and I sat outside in the sun. It was hot and I practically shotgunned my ginger turmeric smoothie.

I was working on a project and wanted his feedback. It was an artificial intelligence testing platform. David is one of the leading experts on autonomous systems, so who better to talk to?

The project never materialized, but I made a new friend.

We hit it off. David is a great listener with a kind demeanor. It’s probably apparent in our conversation here; David is as good with people as he is with technology. And he is very good with technology.

He has multiple degrees from MIT including a PhD in autonomous scheduling and planning. He worked on the F-35 fighter jet and his thesis code was used on the Mars Curiosity Rover. He’s worked everywhere from DARPA to Boeing to Pratt and Whitney. He knows as much about computer science and software development as anyone in the world.

Now he’s a co-founder at a school that’s redefining modern educational paradigms (Learn more about NuVu here). I’m so glad he had time for this conversation.

In today’s talk we go over:

  • AI – Past, present, and future.
  • How to learn complex topics quickly
  • Education and how David is fixing it.

Enjoy episode 7 of Hacker Practice with David Wang:


[2.45] David explains how we have come out of “Artificial Intelligence Winter” and why AI is about to take off

[5.10] AI ethics and morality and the end game

[5.45] David discusses how codifying algorithms lead him to forging a career in AI

[7.15] David discusses why following your hobby is a very important step in figuring out what you are on this planet to do:

  • David enjoyed building computers from scratch
  • Built a processor from logic gates in his spare time after studying

[13.30] David describes what it’s like working on research projects with DARPA – Advanced research project agency of the defence department. ARPA is most famous for creating the internet.

[14.45] Learning interesting topics – PHD automated planning and scheduling – AI subcategory

[16.45] David describes AI planning and scheduling in detail!

  • Ask how would we describe the world to a computer with true or false statements E.g. is the coffee cup on the table? True/false
  • We then have a language which we can use to describe the world as is and how we want it to be (known in the AI world as “the goal”)
  • Describe an action with a set of preconditioned statements that create a set of effects. Planning and scheduling involves sequencing these actions to get from your starting point to the goal.

[21.10] David describes planning system projects he worked on at MIT involving decision making algorithms to block malicious hacking tactics.

[23.20] David discusses the two types of hackers that are most dangerous

[25.00] David describes his experiences of working on AI robotics projects for Boeing

  • Why programming frameworks haven’t innovated until now

[34.20] How video gaming was David’s gateway drug to programming. David also describes how we can take learnings from video game construction to the real world and contextual AI applications.

[38.20] David discusses the concept, “you can do anything, but you can’t do everything”

[40.40] David describes personal hacks he has for learning

  • Start by asking why something is the way it is and understand the reasons behind something. Is there an intuition that is extractable that will allow you to remember why something is the way it is.

[42.45] David talks about working on Augmented Reality applications in smart homes

[44.30] Hacks to remember the names of people you meet

[49.00] David gives an example of how AR in the smart home context, could be used to help a non-technical person, solve a technical problem, without the need for a technician

[50.40] David gives his insights on Virtual Reality (VR) applications

[54.00] Discussion on learning and facing adversity

[56.40] David discusses his experiences working on the F-35 jet fighter

  • David would essentially imagine all the different ways the plane could fail and reverse engineer solutions to prevent failure
  • How David used the spiral development cycle to understand how the F-35 worked

[1.04.00] Complexity comes not necessarily from the technology but from the number of moving parts

  • David talks space exploration applications

[1.08.10] How David deals with the isolation of being at the top of a field

[1.10.20] Why it is so important to understand students underlying motivators to learn

[1.13.20] Why it is important to decide if college is the right medium for students. College shouldn’t be used as the only time to decide what you want to do with your life.

[1.16.45] David discusses why he started NuVu and shares his insights on teaching intuition

  • By realising that the projects that really piqued his interest during studies were all based on extracurricular activities, David went out to challenge the existing education model.

[1.20.30] What it’s like to run a school which has no classes, subjects or grades

  • Students need to come up with an idea they are super passionate about. They are then taught how to turn it into a great idea.
  • Students skills are then develop to turn this idea into a solution. The difference from formal learning here, is that they are invested in learning these skills because they are passionate, as opposed to being forced.
  • Encourage students to understand the fundamental concepts of human centred design thinking when ideating and developing their solution

[1.25.20] Justus gets David to deconstruct an idea using his teaching methodology. Spoiler: There is a lot of asking “why”

[1.31.30] How to not avoid losing sight of your original idea in the face of pivoting

[1.34.00] What someone could expect as a new student at NuVu

[1.37.10] How to start a school like NuVu on the cheap

  • NuVu is a private educational business that is not accredited. How important is accreditation? In the case of NuVu, it isn’t.
  • Ask, what does success look like for students leaving your school?
  • NuVu wants to create the innovators of the future. There is a strong emphasis on soft skills.

[1.43.30] The goal of working in a team is to create a giant brain

[1.46.30] David discusses a seasonal effective disorder (SED) project some of his students are working on

[1.48.20] What a parent who wants to send their child to NuVu need to know

[1.49.30] How David plans on scaling by helping existing schools adopt the NuVu education model

  • Use Maker Spaces more effectively

[1.53.20], David asks us to think about what success means to you and is college critical on that path to success?

What’s next?

If you enjoyed today’s episode, subscribe to Hacker Practice on iTunes (and leave a review please :D)

Nari Savanorke-Joyce: Zen and the Art of Data Science

Camping on the coast of Maine 2016

I met Nari Savanorke-Joyce while living with 20 other people in a double-wide row home in Boston’s most elite neighborhood. She had just graduated from Wellesley College (Hillary Clinton’s Alma Mater) and was getting started in entry-level corporate America.

Within a year she had become one of her company’s most valuable data scientists.

Nari and I used to go sailing on the Charles River. We’d talk about economics, education, and the future of technology. Those conversations were fascinating to be a part of, so I thought: “Why not bring the genius of Nari on the show?”

As a professional, Nari takes cutting edge predictive models from the dusty shelves of academia and puts them to work on important business cases. She’s a technical expert in data science but more than that, she’s a chameleon who deftly maneuvers the social and political conditions of whatever situation she’s in.

Our conversation in episode 4 of Hacker Practice takes place on Skype, with Nari calling in from a poppin’ lounge in Stockholm. If you’re unfamiliar with data science or are looking for career advice for ambitious millennials, you will certainly enjoy this conversation with Nari Savanorke-Joyce:

[1.10] Why Nari booked a trip to Stockholm, Sweden on a whim

[5.50] How Nari learned about entrepreneurship through her parents

  • The importance of failure in the journey and grit required to bounce back

[6.30] Why Nari uses meditation to stay focused

[9.30] Adapting to the corporate world despite having entrepreneurship
in your blood

  • How to adapt to different environments
  • Parental influence in this domain

[13.50] Why putting yourself in a position where you aren’t in control is important for self-development

[16.10] Discussion on data science

Good data scientists excel in three directions:

  1. Domain expertise
  2. Computer science / programming skills
  3. Statistical modelling skills

DATA SCIENCE = Taking massive quantities of data and turning it into actionable insights

[18.30] Discussion on the methodology of data science (How to Data Science 101)

  1. Find a problem to solve
  2. Find the data
  3. Clean the data
  4.  Apply a model

[22.10] How an insurance company uses data science to stop insurance fraud?

  • Use models to predict low frequency high severity impact events

[30.30] Incentive structures in a data science role

[33.50] Using logistic regression to ask binary questions i.e. is person x likely to commit fraud?

  • Using survivor modelling to understand claim lifespan

[37.30] Why data cleansing is the most time consuming component of data science?

  • Using AI to detect pattern anomalies

[42.20] Discussion on behavioural economics (psychology and economics) and how to derive value in data science

[45.00] Behavioral economics is not classical economics

  • Can behavioral economics be used to improve lives and business?

[45.30] Specific advice for ambitious young people

  • Get out of debt
  • Find community with older people

[47.00] Importance in investing in continuous education

  • Focus on learning as a motivator

[51.50] Diversification vs focus lesson from Nari’s parents – “You have to go all in if you really want to pursue something”  

[55.00] On insurance start-ups attracting corporate talent

  • Begin with the “why” and be more than profit seeking

[58.10] Personal finance and budgeting

  • Awareness via categorisation of spending
  • Automatically save a percentage of your income

[1.03.20] Future of data science

  • Using data to continuously dive deeper and personalise – huge potential in the health sector

[1.05.00] Nari provides podcast interview tactics that she’d like to see adopted by Hacker Practice podcast

[1.06.00] Nari’s Top tier interviewees:

[1.10.10] Nari’s book recommendations

[1.15.10] Travel hacks to save money

  • Grocery stores are a great way to save money instead of eating out but also to learn about local food and culture
  • Walk everywhere, especially if the city or place you are visiting is compact

[1.16.20] Final piece of advice to listeners

  • Try 10 minutes of meditation per day

Conclusion

If you enjoyed the show please subscribe to Hacker Practice on iTunes. Hit me with suggestions of who you’d like to see on the show (@justuseapen). Leave me a review on iTunes. If you do any of these for me I will of course love you long time.

Thank you for listening!

How to Get Shredded, Break World Records, and Write Killer Copy with Stan Dutton (003)

Stan Dutton has multiple world records in power lifting.

Stan Dutton overseeing a small group class

Stan Dutton is the co-owner of UpLifted Inc. in Boston. He was one of the top 20 165-pound powerlifters in the United States in 2014. He completed 300 hours of hands-on training at the American Academy of Personal Training and earned his Training for Warriors Level 2 certification. He is a second degree black belt in Taekwondo.

I met Stan Dutton while recording the CEO of my startup doing squats at his gym. For form. But that’s not important.

Stan and I immediately hit it off. Two young college dropouts trying to make it as entrepreneurs in the city of higher education (Boston). It was practically destiny that we became friends.

Stan and his partner Nathan were running a Training for Warriors franchise location when I met them. Stan impressed me with world records in powerlifting and constant enthusiasm for life and business. He’s also a genuinely nice guy.

Now, Stan is undergoing a transformation. I feel very fortunate to interview him in the midst of transition.

In our talk, Stan tells me about his philosophy of fitness. He teaches some breathing exercises that helped him break world records in powerlifting. We talk about creatine and copywriting. He shares about the latest developments in his career.

I tell a story about poop.

It’s an exciting time to be a top-flight personal trainer. The zeitgeist around diet and exercise is constantly changing and Stan is right at the edge of what normal people can engage with.

Find out how Stan gets crazy results with ordinary people in episode 003 of Hacker Practice:

Notes

[2.10] Stan discusses being the personal trainer for the CEO of Pavlok and how he met Justus.

[5.20] Stan describes his philosophy on fitness:

  • An empathetic approach without having to a stereotypical “burn them down” trainer and rather “build them up”
  • Built on a foundation of integrity
  • Stan puts the “fun” in functional fitness.
  • Train for consistency and focus on having fun in the process.

[10.30] Stan gives tips on how he would go about training up Justus to become an elite level athlete in only 6 months.

  • Train to your genetic physical strengths
  • Intensive training needs to be supported with longevity training

[15.00] Justus shares a story about how he broke 2 hours in a half marathon after taking a poop!

[21.30] Stan shares details on the records he broke including lifting 3 times his bodyweight as well as the importance of breathing exercises

  • Stan explains how he uses specific breathing exercises to enhance his lifting capability
  • Proper breathing is fundamental to a great posture which is critical to effective and efficient powerlifting.
  • Breathing needs to occur through your diaphragm. You want to feel like you are breathing through your stomach. Your collarbone should remain relatively stable if performed properly.

[31.00] Discussion on Stan’s preferred protein supplements and common misconceptions around creatine

  • Creatine, monohydrate for strength and mass building
  • Creatine essentially gives your muscles extra energy to be able to max out repetitions. The cells will draw in extra water to enable this process which can cause dehydration. So it’s especially important to be vigilant of hydration when using creatine supplements.
  • Stan shares how taking too much creatine as an adolescent resulted in severe nausea, loss of appetite and the beginnings of dialysis.
  • Taking hormones can result in Gynecomastia (enlarged breasts)

[40.00] Pros/cons of fasting

[42.30] Stan says why he thinks college is a waste of time and explains how getting hands on experience, has set him up for success in the personal training industry

  • Not going to college taught Stan how to deal with uncertainty in business relationships

[48.00] “At one point a degree used to be a differentiator…now not having a degree is a differentiator”

[49.15] Why suffering is the best thing that can happen to someone because it forces them to grow and change

[51.00] Stan describes his tips on writing epic emails and copy

  • Attention
  • Interest
  • Desire
  • Action
  • Learn how to be empathetic and put yourself in your customer’s shoes. Remember, people buy from people.
  • Stan suggests Paul Mort as a fantastic resource for writing quality copy

[58.50] Stan describes specific tactics for selling high value coaching services

  • The power of specific personal examples and sharing vulnerability with clients

[1.04.00] Why having a personal coach will help you become a better version of yourself

[1.08.00] Stan describes the “black swan” event that turned his life upside down

[1.15:30] Stan describes his latest venture – busyguyfitness.com an online platform for busy professionals to complete workouts in time constrained environments

[1.18.40] How Ryan Holiday’s, Ego is the Enemy helped Stan reframe his decision to work as intern and take a “pay cut”

How you can get in touch with Stan:

Instagram: @standutton165

Website: busyguyfitness.com  

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/StanDuttonTraining

Conclusion

If you enjoyed today’s episode please subscribe on iTunes and leave us a review!

Jesse Anderson: Mr. Big Data on Data Engineering, Creativity, and Nontraditional education (002)

Mr. Big Data, Jesse Anderson (http://jesse-anderson.com)

If you’ve ever heard the words “Big Data” and wondered what exactly that means, this is the episode for you.

Jesse Anderson is the person Fortune 100’s go to when they realize they are ill-equipped to handle the challenges of big data. He is a totally self-taught genius who is currently defining a new field of computer science call Data Engineering. In fact, he literally wrote the book on it.

Jesse’s work has been featured in the Wall Street Journal, CNN, NPR, Wired, TechCrunch; just about everywhere.

His insights into the future of information technology and data were fascinating to explore. We also discuss his approach to learning and parenting and teaching creativity.

Listen to our discussion here:

Here are the notes from my talk with Jesse Anderson:

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